Tag Archives: web development

ONLYOFFICE™ – Cloud Office Applications for Collaboration

ONLYOFFICE™ is a multifunctional office suite that enables you to store and co-edit documents, manage projects, email correspondence and customer relations in one place.

Source: ONLYOFFICE™ – Cloud Office Applications

This is intriguing. Looks like some sort of Google Docs / MSFT Office 360 clone in open source. Uses mono to run on Linux. If it works it might be rather useful.

Build nginx with Google PageSpeed module for better performance

This tutorials explains how to build nginx with the latest version of the nginx_pagespeed module on Debian Jessie. The PageSpeed module applies web performance best practices to pages, and associated assets (CSS, JavaScript, images) and therefore speeds up your web site and reduces load times.

How to build nginx with Google PageSpeed module on Debian 8 (Jessie) https://www.howtoforge.com/tutorial/nginx-with-ngx_pagespeed-on-debian-8-jessie/

Seems like an interesting weekend project.

Location, Location, Location! Now I get it.

I’ll admit that for the longest time I didn’t get the mobile world’s fascination with location. It seemed like one of those things that mobile developers did to push ads on me while I was in a grocery store or alert people I vaguely knew to my presence in a museum. Most implementations left me feeling underwhelmed. OK, so my phone knows where I’m at. Then what?

I’m coming around on location-based tech now as I’ve been working with a bit of it for a side project I’ve got going. The light bulb came on while writing a little web app that can tell me where I am and give me some basic info about that place. Turns out that once you peel off the veneer of constant ad generation using location in web apps (and, by extension, mobile apps) is fascinating from the developers point of view. Knowing where someone is provides a hook for offering up a lot of useful data that isn’t about selling things or letting near strangers know where you are.

And it isn’t that hard to do.

A good place to start is with the Google Maps JavaScript API. The developer site provides everything you need to get going with adding interesting location-based features to your apps. I tend to use JQuery when I have to deal with JavaScript and there is an excellent demo page of JQuery Mobile integrations with the Google Maps API with many useful examples.

I’ve put together a little example page for you to try. You’ll need to give it access to your browser location data and then you’ll get some basic location information. I find it interesting that in testing the most accurate location comes from mobile devices. The location data returned by laptop and desktop browsers is a lot less accurate, seemingly giving more weight to your IP address than other factors.

 

Replacing Native Apps With Ten CSS One-Liners Using CSS Multi-column Layout and CSS Figures

Tablets and mobile devices require us to rethink web design. Moused scrollbars will be replaced by paged gestures, and figures will float in multi-column layouts. Can this be expressed in CSS?
Paged designs, floating figures, and multi-column layout are widely used on mobile devices today. For some examples, see Flipboard, the Our Choice ebook, or Facebook Paper. These are all native apps. If we want the web to win on these devices (we do), it’s vital that designers can build these kinds of presentations using web standards. If web standards cannot express this, authors will be justified in making native apps.
Over the past years, I’ve been editing two specifications that, when combined, provide this kind of functionality: CSS Multi-column Layout and CSS Figures. I believe they are important to make sure the web remains a compelling environment for content providers.

via Ten CSS One-Liners to Replace Native Apps ∙ An A List Apart Blog Post.

These are relatively new standards and current browser implementation is still rolling. With any luck we’ll see wide adoption of the standards and a another way to build exciting websites.