Novell Hires Samba Co-Author

Novell Tightens Its Open-Source Embrace
Novell is continuing its embrace of the open-source community with new hires and the promise of even greater integration with key open-source projects.

Novell Inc. has just hired Jeremy Allison, co-author of the Samba open-source software suite, which delivers file and print services to SMB/CIFS (Server Message Block/Common Internet File System) clients.

NoMachine NX

freshmeat.net: Project details for NoMachine NX
This is the first source snapshot of the NX components that will power the upcoming 1.5.0 release of NX Client and NX Server. This version contains new features that include full support for rootless operation in the X11 agent, continuous operation while disconnected, dynamic handling of the geometry of the remote desktop, full support for 16-bit and 24-bit color modes in RDP sessions, and a new NX transport model that ensures easier integration, reduced overhead, and better performance.

First Podcast Driven Radio Station

Infinity Set To Debut First Podcasting Radio Station
Beginning today, users will be able to upload podcasts of varying lengths for free at www.kyouradio.com where it will be eligible to be selected for broadcast. Programming on the station will be determined by listener interests and feedback, and evaluated on a daily basis.

Picked this up via Scripting News. Sounds like a neat idea, but it could get a little scary:) The site mentioned right now is a little bare, but it does invite you to upload your podcasts. I couldn’t find any public information about copyright, royalties to podcasters, etc. so there is no way of telling what happens when you upload your stuff. The general terms of use of site are pretty standard, but I wonder, if I upload something, do I lose control of it? Am I signing over copyright? Do I get royalties? Should I just be happy that I’m geting ‘air time’? I’m sure a big opreation like Infinity has thought these things out. It would be nice to share.

Yahoo! Launches MyWeb Personal Search

Yahoo! Search blog: Saving, Sharing, and Syndicating Search via My Web
Today, we launched a ‘My Web’, a new personal search engine fully integrated with Yahoo! Search. My Web is based on a very simple principle – a search engine should enable you to define and use the information that’s important to you. Specifically, My Web enables you to find the information relevant to you, save it, share it, add your own notes to it, and easily find it again, whether it’s three days or three months later.

I’ve been using the beta for several months and it is handy. I stick stuff on it that I need for later, replacing some of the function of my blog.

Floranta: Collaboration Spaces

freshmeat.net: Project details for Floranta
Floranta provides tools to build collaborative real-time discussion boards, notice boards, and extended chat services that can be embedded in Web pages. It also includes extreme programming tools that allow users to create index cards, drop them on tables and move them, and conduct a distributed planning game collaboratively in real time.

Professionals Prefer Firefox

Internet Week > News > Firefox Used By 1 In 10 Business Professionals > April 26, 2005
Professionals are using Firefox over IE because they like the browser’s tabbed browsing feature and they see it as less of a security risk than the Microsoft browser,

We’ve seen IE usage decline from 98.5% to 91.75% since August on the CALi website.

Using CSS to Create a Frames Layout

How to Create a Frames Layout with CSS – WebReference.com
By far the most sought after use of CSS is to emulate the dated html ‘frame’ layout, whereby the header, navigation and footer stay on screen at all times and the content area will scroll. Since the adoption of the fixed position style by the latest browsers this is quite an easy task for CSS. Unfortunately, Internet Explorer hasn’t introduced this style into it’s repertoire (perhaps IE7 will correct this deficiency when it’s released later this year).

Fortunately, there are ways around this and it’s possible to make Internet Explorer versions IE5.01, 5.5 and 6 fall into line with the rest.”

IEBlog Explains PNG Implementation in IE7

IEBlog : IE7 Transparent PNG Implementation
My name is Sam Fortiner and I’m a developer on the Internet Explorer team here at Microsoft. I joined the company about a year ago when I was given the opportunity to work on IE. Since then I’ve worked on several aspects of IE and recently settled down into the layout and display team. As part of my work in this team, I implemented support for per-pixel alpha in PNGs.

Aside from the fact this is avery good explanantion of what it took to get transparent PNG support into IE7, this post alos illustrates evrything that is good about corporate blogging. Indeed the entire IEBlog is a testament to how blogging can be used to connect with customers. We could all learn from this.

WordPerfect, Not Dead Yet, Gets An Email Client

Corel adds e-mail client to WordPerfect suite | InfoWorld | News | 2005-04-26 | By Joris Evers, IDG News Service
The e-mail client is based on Bloomba, which was distributed by San Mateo, California-based Stata Labs until that company was acquired by Yahoo last October. Bloomba was lauded by reviewers as being efficient and easy to use, but it lacked a high profile. Yahoo discontinued distribution of Bloomba after it bought Stata Labs.

Corel was in talks with Stata Labs before it was taken over by Yahoo and has now struck a deal with the Sunnyvale, California, Internet company to distribute Bloomba as WordPerfect Mail, said Richard Carriere, a general manager at Corel. Details of the agreement were not disclosed.

Pegasus Mail Ponders Open Source

Pegasus Mail and Linux
As discontent with Microsoft’s “business practices” grows, we have seen unprecedented interest in alternative solutions for operating systems and applications. As a natural consequence of this, I have received numerous, or maybe even innumerable requests for a Linux version of Pegasus Mail. As a corollary to these requests, I have had a lot of people suggest that I also move to an Open Source basis for maintaining the Pegasus Mail and Mercury source code.

In the past, I have taken a cautious “wait-and-see” approach to the idea of Open Source. I am now willing to accept that it is a valid model, and that it is producing some genuinely excellent packages (such as FireFox, of which I am inordinately fond). Ideologically, I believe that Open Source and I are a good match, and I would like to consider going that way.

Pegasus Mail has always been one of my favorite windows email clients. I hope David Harris finds away to take it to open source.