Spot API is an issue spotter making use of NSMIv2 and built upon Learned Hands data

Spot is an NSMIv2 entity/issue spotter built by Suffolk University’s Legal Innovation and Technology (LIT) Lab. Spot builds upon data from the Learned Hands online game, a partnership between the LIT Lab and Stanford’s Legal Design Lab. Learned Hands aims to crowdsource the labeling of laypeople’s legal questions for the training of machine learning (ML) classifiers/issue spotters.

Source: Spot API Performance

In a nut shell you send a legal question and it returns a set of NSMIv2 tags. One could then use the those tags to link to resources that are using NSMI to tag/classify data. One catch here is that it is not clear how many public websites are using NSMI to tag content.

GraphQL | A query language for your API

GraphQL is a query language for APIs and a runtime for fulfilling those queries with your existing data. GraphQL provides a complete and understandable description of the data in your API, gives clients the power to ask for exactly what they need and nothing more, makes it easier to evolve APIs over time, and enables powerful developer tools.

Source: GraphQL | A query language for your API

Tutorial: How to build a GraphQL server – Apollo GraphQL

[H]ow to build a GraphQL server that connects to multiple backends: A SQL database, a MongoDB database and a REST endpoint. We’ll be combining all of them to build a very basic blog with authors, posts and views.

Tutorial: How to build a GraphQL server – Apollo GraphQL

Combining Posts From Multiple WordPress Sites Using The REST API

This article provides a detailed walkthrough on how to use the REST API to combine posts from multiple WordPress sites. It’s also a good example of how to use JavaScript promises and leverage the browser’s local storage API.

Source: Combining Posts From Multiple WordPress Sites Using The REST API

Randall Degges – Why I Love Basic Auth

Let’s talk about Basic Auth:

  • It’s a well and clearly defined specification.
  • It’s been around since ~1996.
  • It’s super simple.

Here’s the short version of how it works.

  • You are a developer.
  • You have an API key pair: an API Key ID and an API Key Secret. Each of these is a randomly generated string (usually a uuid).
  • To authenticate against an API service, all you need to do is put your credentials into the HTTP Authorization header.

Source: Randall Degges – Why I Love Basic Auth

Amazon API Gateway – Build and Run Scalable Application Backends | AWS Official Blog

Amazon API Gateway – Build and Run Scalable Application Backends | AWS Official Blog https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-api-gateway-build-and-run-scalable-application-backends/

Seldon is an open source recommendation platform

Seldon is made up of many components that work together to deliver the best recommendations. Roughly, all user actions are captured via the REST API and streamed to logs. Those logs are processed in batch and new user models are delivered to the API Server. Then recommendations are delivered via the REST API.

http://docs.seldon.io/tech.html

The code for Seldom is on Github at https://github.com/SeldonIO/seldon-server.

Kong – Open-Source API Management Layer

Kong – Open-Source API Management Layer http://getkong.org/ “The open-source management layer for APIs, delivering high performance and reliability.”